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Local Sports

 


The History of
Sadieville High School

In 1898 a two-story frame schoolhouse was built in Sadieville for $2500 on a lot donated by T.J. Burgess on the spot where the present school now stands. Miss Jennie Quinn was the teacher of the new school. In 1911 a two-year high school program was added and the first two-year graduating class in 1913 included six students. The construction of a new building to accommodate the growing number of students occurred in 1924. Mr. Ebon Champion, principal at that time, remained to see the school grow into a full four-year high school. In 1924 the first four-year class graduated from Sadieville High School. Between 1932 and 1950, Sadieville school was expanded to include a library, restrooms, a gymnasium, and a lunch room. An agricultural program and Home economics were added to the curriculum. In 1955 Sadieville High School was joined with other area schools to become Scott County High School. 

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Scott County Museum

The Smithsonian’s Hometown Teams traveling exhibition examines the many roles that sports play in American society. Hometown sports are more than just games—they shape our lives and unite us and celebrate who we are as Americans. We play on ball fields and sandlots, on courts and on the ice, in parks and playgrounds, even in the street. From pick-up games to organized leagues, millions of Americans of all ages play sports. And, if we’re not playing sports, we’re watching them. We sit in the stands and root for the local high school team, or gather on the sidelines and cheer on our sons and daughters as they take their first swing or score their first goal.

Thanks to our never-ending appetite for competition and games, Americans now have a wider selection of sports to play and watch than ever before. Football, baseball, and basketball—America’s traditional hometown sports—share space on our calendars with soccer, hockey, tennis, running, wrestling, skiing, snowboarding, skateboarding, surfing, sailing, and many other sports. What has occurred in our hometowns is nothing less than a sports revolution. Click each photo to enlarge it.

Stamping Ground High School

Georgetown High School

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Hometown Teams consisted of several sections that explore the many roles that sports play in American society. Hometown sports are more than just games—they shape our lives and unite us and celebrate who we are as Americans. Our exhibit that ran from November 17th, 2018, to December 27th, 2018 consisted of a Smithsonian centerpiece with an accompanying assortment of local sports memorabilia.

The History of
Ed Davis High School

In 1884 a school was erected for the specific purpose of giving African American students a permanent school building. Professor Charles Steele, heralded as a distinguished educator, was named the first principal of the new school. Edward B. Davis followed as principal in 1908. In 1911 a two-year high school curriculum was added and in 1924 a four-year high school curriculum. In 1929 the PTA petitioned the school board to name the school in honor of Principal Edward Davis. Ed Davis High School became an accredited high school in 1934. Edward Davis' wife Betty Davis became principal upon his death in 1934. One of her greatest accomplishments while the principal was the establishment of a scholarship loan fund to assist worthy students in obtaining post-high school education. Mr. Benjamin Goodloe Patterson succeeded her as principal in 1943 and continued the fine curriculum as well as adding new programs despite the lack of equipment and funds. In May of 1956, the last class graduated from Ed Davis High School due to the Supreme Court ruling on desegregation. Ed Davis joined Garth High School in the Fall of 1956. Later, both schools became part of Scott County High School.

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The History of
Great Crossing High School

The first school in Great Crossing was a one-room limestone rock building. In April of 1913, the Scott County School Board purchased four acres of land from Willie and Kate Robinson for $1,000 in order to build a new school for the Great Crossing community. The school was a two-story building that housed mostly grade schoolers, but some high school classes. In the early 1930s, a stage and gymnasium were built and those rooms provided additional space for high school classes. The first four years high- school class graduated from Great Crossing in 1929. A new high school building was constructed and ready for occupancy in 1939. The new building, with its wide halls and indoor plumbing, was a source of joy to all the children attending. Students of Great Crossing High School remember fondly the tremendous rapport between the faculty and students. The Great Crossing High School was used by the community until it was consolidated with the other schools to become part of Scott County High School in 1956.  

 


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Georgetown &

The History of
Garth High School

Garth High School was built on the former spot of the Georgetown Female Seminary in 1925. The school was named after Edwin Claude Garth who was killed in an automobile accident. His parents donated a substantial amount of money toward the purchase of land for the new school as a memorial to their son. J.W. Lancaster, Superintendent of Georgetown City Schools at the time, sought a way within the strict law of bonded indebtedness to provide for the school at a cost of $200,000. The solution he proposed was so ingenious that it was named the "Georgetown Case" and copied by approximately 75 other school boards across the Commonwealth. After a struggle to finance the building, Garth opened for classes in 1927. It was an architectural wonder designed by Frankel and Curtis architects. The Collegiate Gothic style building was composed of buttresses, towers, stone labels, and a battlement roofline, giving it a timeless feel. 

Ed Davis High School

Great Crossing High School

From pick-up games to organized leagues, millions of Americans of all ages play sports. And, when not playing, they’re watching sports, sitting in the stands and rooting for the local high school team or gathering on the sidelines and cheering on sons and daughters as they take their first swing or score their first goal.


In keeping with the spirit of the exhibit, we focused on sports at Scott County’s high schools from as far back as the 1920s and 1930s. Memorabilia included athletic jerseys and jackets, photographs of early area sports teams, particularly basketball and football teams, and the history relating to the schools.


Additionally, we showcased one of Scott County's most famous sports headliners – the late Archie Burchfield, a legendary croquet player from Stamping Ground who won numerous state and national titles as well as the title of world champion croquet player. The Kentucky Croquet Hall of Famer and Croquet Foundation of America Hall of Famer was the subject of numerous articles in such high-profile publications as People Magazine, the New Yorker, Sports Illustrated and Connoisseur and appeared on the “Pat Sajak Show,” “On the Road Again” with Charles Kuralt, “Lifestyle on Sports” and “Portrait of America.”



Garth High School

The Smithsonian

The History of
Stamping Ground High School

The first Stamping Ground School was located in northwestern Scott County on Main Street in Stamping Ground. The original school building was completely destroyed by fire in 1923. Students were forced to hold class in a make-shift barn-like structure until another building was raised. In 1938 the new school building was also destroyed by fire. A new and final building was in place by 1940. This time fourteen smaller schools in the area joined Stamping Ground School in the new building. In the 1950s grades, nine through twelve were removed from Stamping Ground and joined with other area high schools to form Scott County High School. 

Scott County High Schools

The History of
Georgetown High School

1958, Georgetown High School was built as a result of the city high school being over-crowded. The school building was built on a twenty-acre tract adjacent to McKnight Sub-Division on South Hamilton Street. Key players in the construction of this new school were Dr. H. B. Wells, school board chairman, Fred C. Nichols, vice-chairman, and Kenneth Gillespie, superintendent at that time. The first principal of the new school was Roy R. Camic. In the 1970s, Georgetown High School merged to become part of Scott County High School and the building used as a middle school (Georgetown Middle School). 

Oxford High School

The History of
Oxford High School

One of the first schools in Oxford was built by E.C. Muddiman from 16,000 bricks left from the building of a church across the road. In 1918 the Scott County Board of Education bought two acres of land from Mr. A.T. Glenn for $500.00 to add to the school property. In 1927 a new building containing six classrooms and the county's first rural gymnasium was constructed. With the merging of several area schools came the necessity of transportation. J.K. Feeback, a parent, agreed to outfit a pickup buck bed with seats and a tarpaulin to transport children to Oxford school, nicknamed, "Feeback's Bus". In 1928 more land was purchased from Mrs. A.T. Glenn for $432.00. Two classrooms were added in 1932 and a wing was added to the north end of the building in 1938. During the 1940's Newtown and Dry Run schools, both closed and some of their students joined Oxford.

Hometown Teams

 


Sadieville High School